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Zelle scam targets Kansas man for fake $2,500 refund through bank account | #phishing | #scams | #hacking | #aihp


Taylor Witt is hoping for a refund from U.S. Bank or Zelle after he said he fell for a very sophisticated scam.Witt emailed KMBC 9 Investigates for help after he said someone stole $2,500 from his U.S. Bank account through a fake Zelle refund scam.Witt said the scammer called him from a number impersonating his bank’s fraud department. The scammer told him that his bank account was hit by a fraudulent Zelle transaction, convincing Witt to go through a fake refund process with Zelle.Reluctant at first, he said the scammer convinced him to look at the back of his debit card to compare the telephone number to the caller ID on his cell phone, and the numbers then matched.Witt said that he has tried to get U.S. Bank to refund the money, but so far, the bank has not budged.”It was just very devastating,” he said. “It just didn’t register with me that the person warning me of the fraud was the one trying to take the money.” Witt has seen news stories across the country of people falling for digital payment scams, along with a push by lawmakers to get banks to refund people’s money. A U.S. Bank spokesman said he was looking into Witt’s account. U.S. Bank does provide tips on how to avoid being the victim of digital payment scams.Zelle did not immediately respond to an email from KMBC 9 Investigates.A spokeswoman for the parent company of Zelle, Early Warning, said the payment platform acts as a messaging service in transactions.”Because we don’t hold the funds we’re not able to to give back the money to the consumer,” said Meghan Fintland, spokeswoman for Early Warning. “They have to do that through their bank.”Zelle also offers a list of tips to make sure people don’t get scammed. Nikolas Reese with the Better Business Bureau of Greater Kansas City said that it is important to only send money to people you know.”Unless you know that person in your personal life that would not use a digital wallet service to send money to them,” Reese said.Witt is now hoping for a refund.”It’s very sophisticated in their approach,” he said.And he has a warning for others, “The moment you hit that button, that money is out of your account.”If you fell for a similar scam involving Zelle, KMBC 9 Investigates would like to know. Email investigates@kmbc.com if you are willing to share your story.

Taylor Witt is hoping for a refund from U.S. Bank or Zelle after he said he fell for a very sophisticated scam.

Witt emailed KMBC 9 Investigates for help after he said someone stole $2,500 from his U.S. Bank account through a fake Zelle refund scam.

Witt said the scammer called him from a number impersonating his bank’s fraud department. The scammer told him that his bank account was hit by a fraudulent Zelle transaction, convincing Witt to go through a fake refund process with Zelle.

Reluctant at first, he said the scammer convinced him to look at the back of his debit card to compare the telephone number to the caller ID on his cell phone, and the numbers then matched.

Witt said that he has tried to get U.S. Bank to refund the money, but so far, the bank has not budged.

“It was just very devastating,” he said. “It just didn’t register with me that the person warning me of the fraud was the one trying to take the money.”

Witt has seen news stories across the country of people falling for digital payment scams, along with a push by lawmakers to get banks to refund people’s money.

A U.S. Bank spokesman said he was looking into Witt’s account. U.S. Bank does provide tips on how to avoid being the victim of digital payment scams.

Zelle did not immediately respond to an email from KMBC 9 Investigates.

A spokeswoman for the parent company of Zelle, Early Warning, said the payment platform acts as a messaging service in transactions.

“Because we don’t hold the funds we’re not able to to give back the money to the consumer,” said Meghan Fintland, spokeswoman for Early Warning. “They have to do that through their bank.”

Zelle also offers a list of tips to make sure people don’t get scammed.

Nikolas Reese with the Better Business Bureau of Greater Kansas City said that it is important to only send money to people you know.

“Unless you know that person in your personal life that would not use a digital wallet service to send money to them,” Reese said.

Witt is now hoping for a refund.

“It’s very sophisticated in their approach,” he said.

And he has a warning for others, “The moment you hit that button, that money is out of your account.”

If you fell for a similar scam involving Zelle, KMBC 9 Investigates would like to know. Email investigates@kmbc.com if you are willing to share your story.

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