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Who’s to Blame for Hacked Social Media Accounts, Spoofed Online Meeting Requests and Malware | #hacking | #cybersecurity | #infosec | #comptia | #pentest | #hacker | #hacking | #aihp


In episode 320, Tom and Scott discuss the contentious issue of who is accountable when Facebook or Instagram accounts are hacked, discussing potential failings on both the user’s and Meta’s part. They explore the possibility of inadequate security measures on these platforms and the implications of Meta potentially profiting from fraudulent ads. The episode also covers a Wired article regarding 41 state attorney generals in the U.S. urging Meta to enhance their security to manage the rising complaints of account theft. Furthermore, the ‘Aware Much’ segment highlights a new threat involving spoofed Zoom, Google, and Skype meeting requests that spread remote access Trojans (RATs), discussing the sophistication of these phishing attacks and malware’s ability to compromise systems. The conversation touches on the effectiveness of two-factor authentication (2FA), the challenge of identifying malicious URLs, and the role of government in pressuring companies like Meta to improve security practices.

** Links mentioned on the show *

Meta Abandons Hacking Victims, Draining Law Enforcement Resources, Officials Say
https://www.wired.com/story/meta-hacked-users-draining-resources/

Spoofed Zoom, Google & Skype Meetings Spread Corporate RATs
https://www.darkreading.com/cyberattacks-data-breaches/spoofed-zoom-google-skype-meetings-spread-corporate-rats

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The post Who’s to Blame for Hacked Social Media Accounts, Spoofed Online Meeting Requests and Malware appeared first on Shared Security Podcast.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Shared Security Podcast authored by Tom Eston. Read the original post at: https://sharedsecurity.net/2024/03/11/whos-to-blame-for-hacked-social-media-accounts-spoofed-online-meeting-requests-and-malware/


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