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When it comes to your child’s safety, how do you know who to trust? | #childsafety | #kids | #chldern | #parents | #schoolsafey | #hacking | #aihp


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In 2014, the federal government created a rule requiring states to publish data on how many children die in child care every year, and how many are seriously injured or abused at facilities meant to care for them. But a decade later, an investigation from The 19th found that more than a dozen states are still failing to consistently report cases of deaths, serious injuries and abuse. Why is a regulation that was designed to ensure children’s safety taking so long to implement? 

Over six months, The 19th pored over state-level reports and each of their 300-plus-page state child care plans while consulting with more than 40 experts in the child care and child welfare space. We sought input from the federal government and reached out to every state, some of which we spoke to at length about issues they were facing coming into compliance. 

As Chabeli Carrazana details in her story, the lack of compliance with the federal rules has created questions about accountability, particularly for the parents and caregivers of children who have died or been hurt. Cynthia King spent years advocating for change in Hawaii following the death of her infant son. She told The 19th she’s been “chronically disappointed” at states’ lack of urgency in addressing the gaps in the safety requirements.

For King and parents like her, any effort to improve safety in child care will continue to be limited by how well the United States can track where the cracks in the system are. Only then will it know what to prioritize in fixing them. 

For readers, The 19th has also created a comprehensive guide on how to find and choose child care, including questions to ask and tips on vetting programs for safety. Finally, a state-by-state dashboard details which states are in compliance, which are not and why. The dashboard has links to each state’s reports on deaths, serious injuries and instances of substantiated abuse in child care programs, as well as the states’ databases of providers, which include violation and inspection data. 

These resources are designed to arm caregivers with the tools they need to confidently make one of the most important decisions before them: Who can be trusted with their child’s safety?



Her son died in day care. Ten years later, the system that could’ve saved him is still failing.

In 2014, states were required to begin reporting how many children die, are injured or abused in child care. Some still aren’t. For parents who have lost children, it’s proof that the system isn’t working.


  • Read The Full Story:

    Illustration of a mother holding her child in front of a daycare surrounded by police tape. Inside the daycare through a window, two parents are seen speaking to a third person, with shock and desperation on their faces.

  • Read The Full Story:

    Her son died in day care. Ten years later, the system that could’ve saved him is still failing.

The 19th Explains: There’s no guide to looking for child care. We made one.

Child care options are limited and expensive, but knowing how to find quality care, when to look, and how to vet programs and providers can help parents feel confident in their choices.


  • Read The Full Story:

    Illustration of a parent's desk with photos of their child and a post-it that reads 'pick up 3:10.' In the reflection of the desktop computer, the parent can be seen smiling while looking at a picture of her child.

  • Read The Full Story:

    The 19th Explains: There’s no guide to looking for child care. We made one.

Compliance dashboard: Is your state reporting child care deaths, serious injuries and abuse?

States are required to report this data, but some are not. Explore our dashboard to see whether your state complies.


  • Read The Full Story:

    Illustration of a child looking out from inside a day care center. The window of the center is shattered.

  • Read The Full Story:

    Is your state reporting child care deaths, serious injuries and abuse?

Click Here For The Original Source.


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